Schedule

Friday
2019-11-15
_Main Hall_
Room 216
Room 215
Room 213-214
Room 210-211
Saturday
2019-11-16
_Main Hall_
Room 216
Room 215
Room 213-214
Room 210-211
Sunday
2019-11-17
_Main Hall_
Room 216
Room 215
_Main Hall_
Room 216
Room 215
Room 213-214
Room 210-211
_Main Hall_
Room 216
Room 215
Room 213-214
Room 210-211
_Main Hall_
Room 216
Room 215
Registration Opens image
08:00
Registration Opens
For an expedited check-in please bring registration confirmation email that contains the barcode, we can scan either a print out or your phone screen.
SecureWV / Hack3rCon Welcome image
09:0009:50
SecureWV / Hack3rCon Welcome
SecureWV / Hack3rCon Welcome image
Benny Karnes
Sr. Security Engineer at Live Nation Entertainment
Friday Keynote 1 image
10:0010:50
Friday Keynote 1
Friday Keynote 1 image
Josh Spence
State of WV, Chief Technology Officer
Friday Keynote 2 image
11:0011:50
Friday Keynote 2
Friday Keynote 2 image
Robert Krug
Senior Security Solution Architect
LUNCH – On Your Own image
12:0012:50
LUNCH – On Your Own
Python Class image
13:0014:50
Python Class
Dr Esawi
University of Charleston
Chinese Threat image
13:0013:50
Chinese Threat
Chinese Threat image
Fred Aldridge
FBI Special Agent
N00b CTF 101 image
13:0013:50
N00b CTF 101
N00b CTF 101 image
Benny Karnes
Sr. Security Engineer at Live Nation Entertainment
Innocent Lives Foundation image
14:0014:50
Innocent Lives Foundation
Introduction to the Organization and Nature of the Crisis
Innocent Lives Foundation image
Shane McCombs
User Session Recording image
14:0014:50
User Session Recording
The Session Recording project is an effort to design and implement an Open-Source solution for recording user sessions on Linux systems. Many companies need to have their systems used, or even managed by people they don’t entirely trust: contractors, outsourced support, peripheral IT staff, etc. It helps to know what these users or operators were doing on your systems, or even what they’re doing right now, so you can not only prevent repeated issues, but also stop an incident about to happen. Government, medical and certain other organizations can be required by law to collect recordings of user sessions. Financial organizations require tight tracking of what’s happening on their systems. Support desks also appreciate a way to look back at what exactly led to an issue, so they don’t need to talk through a user’s recollection of events. In this talk, Justin will present the concepts, implementation, and future plans for the RHEL/Fedora Session Recording project including: System-level recording component tlog WebUI Front end component cockpit-session recording Available features and functionality to administrators and security teams Demo of Recording and Playback Integration with other Red Hat projects: SSSD, Linux System Roles, Insights Links: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/8/html/recording_sessions/index https://github.com/Scribery/tlog https://github.com/Scribery/cockpit-session-recording
User Session Recording image
Justin Stephenson
Women In Tech – Panel image
14:0014:50
Women In Tech – Panel
Amanda Berlin, Emily Wall, Jimi DeBord, Stacy Cossin, Esther Yim, Lucy Kerner.
Resume Workshop image
14:0014:50
Resume Workshop
Resume Workshop image
Ruth Klinestiver
Account Manager at TEKsystems
N00b CTF 101 image
15:0015:50
N00b CTF 101
N00b CTF 101 image
Benny Karnes
Sr. Security Engineer at Live Nation Entertainment
Containerization for the Hybrid Cloud image
15:0015:50
Containerization for the Hybrid Cloud
The Cloud has drastically changed the computing landscape, but it comes with trade-offs both in design and security. While some sensitive workloads still need to be run on-premise, other applications can take advantage of the public infrastructure. This mix of public and private hardware and the need to keep information in sync between them has led to the hybrid cloud. In this talk, we will explore containers as a design solution for mixed workloads and security measures you can take to protect your data.
Containerization for the Hybrid Cloud image
Adam Vincent
Introduction to BASH Scripting image
15:0017:50
Introduction to BASH Scripting
Course is designed to be a 4-hour introduction to writing shell script using BASH. The course will include several labs to give students a chance to try out some of the basics for getting started with the language. It is recommended that students have a computer running Linux locally or via a virtual machine.
Introduction to BASH Scripting image
Joey Maresca
L0st Kn0wledge
Social Engineering in Non-Linear Warfare image
15:0015:50
Social Engineering in Non-Linear Warfare
This presentation explores the use of hacking, leaking, and trolling by Russia to influence the 2016 United States Presidential Elections. By using proxy hackers and Russian malware to break into the email of the Democratic National Committee and then giving that email to Wikileaks to publish on the Internet, the Russian government attempted to swing the election in the favor of their preferred candidate. The source of the malware used in the DNC hack was determined to be of Russian in nature and has been used on the battlefield in Ukraine, giving the Russians a strategic edge and resulting in heavy loses. Information Warfare and Cyber Warfare of this type is also known as Non-Linear Warfare. Such tactics will continue to be adapted by more adversaries in the future since it has been proven to be successful in both the manipulation of events and effective on the battlefield with very little investment in time or material.
Social Engineering in Non-Linear Warfare image
Bill Gardner
Resume Workshop image
16:0017:50
Resume Workshop
Resume Workshop image
Ruth Klinestiver
Account Manager at TEKsystems
CISA Resources Available for Building Cyber Resilience image
16:0016:50
CISA Resources Available for Building Cyber Resilience
The cyber threat landscape is growing more complex and ever-evolving. When it comes to cyber attacks, it’s no longer a matter of if- or even when, but how frequent and whether operations will be impacted. Incorporating resilience practices can mitigate the impacts of cyber attacks and help to ensure operations can be maintained when disruptions occur. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) is the Nation’s risk advisor, working with partners to defend against today’s threats and collaborating with industry to help protect and secure against the threats of tomorrow. This talk will provide a discussion on what it means to become operationally resilient to cyber attacks and the many no-cost cybersecurity product and services CISA can provide to state and local governments and private sector critical infrastructure in an effort to build a more resilience and cyber secure nation.
CISA Resources Available for Building Cyber Resilience image
Benjamin Gilbert
Hiring, getting hired, and career management for information security: Workforce Development Using the NICE Framework image
16:0016:50
Hiring, getting hired, and career management for information security: Workforce Development Using the NICE Framework
I want to live in a world with easy information security job placement. I want recognition that cybersecurity professionals influence the industry hiring and it’s in need of course-correct. The NIST SP800-181 NICE framework does NOT mention certifications, does not have the concept of SR. vs JR. vs. VP vs. CISSP, and does not require any years of experience. Yet, it lays out ways to better define [the] skills gaps, how to best fit people into InfoSec roles, and what you need to do change careers and land those roles. I want a NICE InfoSec workforce; let’s look at that together.
Hiring, getting hired, and career management for information security: Workforce Development Using the NICE Framework image
David Cybuck
Advantage Technology image
17:0017:50
Advantage Technology
Advantage Technology image
Jack Shaffer
Business Transformation Director
Russia’s Campaign to Influence U.S. Elections image
17:0017:50
Russia’s Campaign to Influence U.S. Elections

Strategic, Operational, Tactical

Disinformation vs. Misinformation

1. Strategic
  • Who?
  • What?
  • Why?
2. Operational
  • How?
  • The new “Great Game”
  • Power of Social Media, Advanced Technologies
3. Tactical
  • Disinformation
  • Competing Rallies
  • Inciting Tension
  • Discourage Voters
  • Oppression of Voters
4. Reaction
  • Protect, Detect, Correct
Russia’s Campaign to Influence U.S. Elections image
Mac Warner
West Virginia Secretary of State
DINNER – On Your Own image
18:0018:50
DINNER – On Your Own
Registration Opens image
08:00
Registration Opens
For an expedited check-in please bring registration confirmation email that contains the barcode, we can scan either a print out or your phone screen.
Red Hat – Hands-On Lab: image
09:0010:50
Red Hat – Hands-On Lab:
Linux Security Technologies & Creating customized security-policy content to automate security compliance
Red Hat – Hands-On Lab: image
Lucy Kerner
Security Global Technical Evangelist and Strategist at Red Hat
Red Hat – Hands-On Lab: image
Roy Williams
Linux Guy at Red Hat, RH
Rogue Device Mitigation image
09:0009:50
Rogue Device Mitigation
While the industry is focused almost entirely on software protection against cyber-attacks, one of the greatest threats resides in rogue or corrupt hardware devices that are present in almost every computing network and infrastructure. From the doctored motherboard chips on our servers that have been corrupted along the supply chain to compromised peripheral devices, mobile phones, and USB drops, hardware vulnerabilities represent a target-rich environment for cyber criminals leveraging a variety of threat exploits. Citing examples occurring recently in the International server manufacturing supply chain, IP theft by disgruntled employees, and data leaks at a Fortune 20 bank, the founder and CEO of Sepio will explain how to detect, prevent, and protect information systems from hardware-based attacks.
Rogue Device Mitigation image
Yossi Appleboum
N00b CTF 101 image
09:0009:50
N00b CTF 101
N00b CTF 101 image
Benny Karnes
Sr. Security Engineer at Live Nation Entertainment
Security D&D (Defense & Detection) Workshop image
09:0011:50
Security D&D (Defense & Detection) Workshop
Security D&D (Defense & Detection) Workshop image
Amanda Berlin
Sr. Security Architect at Blumira
Resume Workshop image
10:0011:50
Resume Workshop
Resume Workshop image
Ruth Klinestiver
Account Manager at TEKsystems
Closed for Business: Taking Down Darknet Markets image
10:0010:50
Closed for Business: Taking Down Darknet Markets
Closed for Business: Taking Down Darknet Markets image
John Shier
Senior Security Advisor at Sophos
Unconventionally Embedding the Hacker Mindset in an Organization image
11:0011:50
Unconventionally Embedding the Hacker Mindset in an Organization
For the past 2.5 years, a few of us at SAP have been trying to redefine how we teach security to employees in our organization. In the past, security was only taught via compliance trainings and forced workshops. This made security more of a mandate than a passion, which is what we wanted to change. To solve this, we built a CTF platform and grew it into a full-fledged security education program, leveraging the existing security experts to multiply their knowledge in the form of challenges. Over time, the traction gained was immense and the biggest breakthrough was that for a first, newbies actually wanted to learn about security. We believe to stay more secure, you need to know the various attack paths adversaries use to penetrate. With this same approach, we were able to create a small but steady army of hackers which has now reached self-sustenance. Through this process, our organization has also benefitted in terms of increase in security awareness + identifying new talents. We also came across a lot of hurdles – from curating content, finding ways to engage the non-technical to sustain a growing, hungry community. I’d like to share the benefits and learnings that I’ve gotten over the years with the security community as I feel this knowledge can be used by many others who are faced with similar challenges as we were a couple of years ago. In this talk, I look to give a quick overview of what CTFs are to get everyone up to speed. Next, I’ll cover some challenges we faced when trying to teach security within a large organization. And highlight the journey we went through while setting up an internal CTF. I’ll also include a starter-kit if someone is looking to get started in setting up such a system. I’ll also show some example challenges as they’re not your orthodox ctftime.org challenges. I had published an article on this in Pentest Magazine sometime last year. The article was focussed on how large organizations can set up a CTF program within their environment, to educate on security. The response I got from it as well as other conferences I had attended was awesome, hence the idea to present it here. I’m attaching the Pentest Magazine article here for your reading.
Unconventionally Embedding the Hacker Mindset in an Organization image
Rohit Nambiar
What We Do In The Shadows: “Going Dark” With Consumer Electronics image
11:0011:50
What We Do In The Shadows: “Going Dark” With Consumer Electronics
Every day we give more and more of ourselves to big companies like Google, Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Samsung, and many others. Every day more and more IoT devices enter our homes with cameras and microphones. And every day it is made easier for us to spy on one another with under the guise of parental controls. Can any of us reclaim our privacy? Yes, but it will not be handed back; it is something that we have to take. Use Tor, Use Signal is no longer enough and by implementing some of these tools and techniques in your daily life; you too can take back your privacy.
What We Do In The Shadows: “Going Dark” With Consumer Electronics image
Timothy Kusajtys
LUNCH – On Your Own image
12:0012:50
LUNCH – On Your Own
It’s Never DNS…. It Was DNS: How Adversaries Are Abusing Network Blind Spots image
13:0013:50
It’s Never DNS…. It Was DNS: How Adversaries Are Abusing Network Blind Spots
While DNS is one of the most commonly used network protocols in most corporate networks, many organizations don’t give it the same level of scrutiny as other network protocols present in their environments. Attackers have recognized this and have begun increasingly abusing DNS to establish command and control channels, exfiltrate sensitive information and bypass many of the common security controls in place to protect corporate networks. DNS has become increasingly attractive to both red teams and malicious attackers alike as a way to easily subvert otherwise solid security architectures. These techniques are no longer reserved for nation states and are now being actively leveraged by organized crimeware groups as well. This presentation will provide several technical breakdowns of real-world attacks that have been seen leveraging DNS for a variety of purposes such as DNSMessenger, DNSpionage, and more. We will also cover examples of the types of payloads being seen in the wild, how to hunt for these types of threats, and how organizations can equip themselves to better defend against these sorts of attacks.
It’s Never DNS…. It Was DNS: How Adversaries Are Abusing Network Blind Spots image
Edmund Brumaghin
Threat Researcher with Cisco Talos
It’s Never DNS…. It Was DNS: How Adversaries Are Abusing Network Blind Spots image
Earl Carter
Threat Researcher for Cisco Talos Security Intelligence and Research Group.
N00b CTF 101 image
13:0013:50
N00b CTF 101
N00b CTF 101 image
Benny Karnes
Sr. Security Engineer at Live Nation Entertainment
Security D&D (Defense & Detection) Workshop image
13:0017:50
Security D&D (Defense & Detection) Workshop
Security D&D (Defense & Detection) Workshop image
Amanda Berlin
Sr. Security Architect at Blumira
The cost savings of NOT terrifying your leadership. image
13:0013:50
The cost savings of NOT terrifying your leadership.
This talk is using the business side of security to help improve information security. By allowing practitioners to use the right data and right approach, you can reduce the resistance to deploying new technologies. By being able to accurately and effectively communicate business risk, you can elevate your security program and initiatives to the level they are no longer just a required item but a desired item.
The cost savings of NOT terrifying your leadership. image
Daniel Efaw
Tunneling Class using SSH, OpenVPN, Wireguard, Zerotier, and Cloudflare Access image
14:0017:50
Tunneling Class using SSH, OpenVPN, Wireguard, Zerotier, and Cloudflare Access
Holden Fenner
Lend me your IR’s! image
14:0002:50
Lend me your IR’s!
Lend me your IR’s! image
Matt Scheurer
Cyber Defense In The Modern Org: 6 Low-Cost Tips To Secure Your Organization image
14:0014:50
Cyber Defense In The Modern Org: 6 Low-Cost Tips To Secure Your Organization
Cybersecurity is often expensive, time-consuming and can have catastrophic consequences if done wrong. From scams designed to steal money to attacks designed to disrupt business and bring production to a halt, attackers have been upping their game continuously. In the meantime, the security vendor’s marketing departments relentlessly try to sell the latest and greatest “solution” to our problems with catchy ideas and the latest trends and buzzwords. Do we really need AI-enabled, ML-enhanced, multi-disciplinary, automated threat hunting cloud-connected, quantum controlled, blockchain-processing toasters in our organizations? Marketing departments sure think so. Sadly, all of this buzzword bingo has drawn attention away from securing the basics in favor of more technology, which requires more trained cybersecurity professionals to manage and really don’t reduce our risk in any meaningful way. This session will focus on 6 low-cost, but vital fundamental security principles that are being overlooked, resulting in significant breaches and disruption in small, medium and global organizations alike.
Cyber Defense In The Modern Org: 6 Low-Cost Tips To Secure Your Organization image
Erich Kron
Block chain and Crypto Currency image
15:0015:50
Block chain and Crypto Currency
Matthew Gonzalez
University of Charleston
“Paying it Forward” with Threat Intelligence image
15:0015:50
“Paying it Forward” with Threat Intelligence
This talk will focus on best practices for creating a threat intelligence program at an organization, the importance of intelligence sharing relationships, as well as strategies for building and maintaining those relationships. I will describe 5 elements that make up a successful threat intelligence program and strategies for implementing them. Then, I will dive into the benefits of intelligence sharing with likeminded organizations. I will also share tips on how to seek out those relationships and examples of organizations that actively participate in intelligence sharing. I will also discuss how to maintain these relationships and ensure that they remain strong.
“Paying it Forward” with Threat Intelligence image
Katie Schwalen
Synopys image
16:0016:50
Synopys
Threat Intel Gathering image
17:0017:50
Threat Intel Gathering
Threat Intel Gathering image
Joe DePlato
Co-Founder + CTO of Bluestone Analytics
Dissect Tor Bridge and Pluggable Transport image
17:0017:50
Dissect Tor Bridge and Pluggable Transport
Tor is renowned for its ability of enabling anonymous Internet communication to protect privacy. It directs Internet traffic through an overlay network to conceal the user’s location and Internet activities. The overlay network consists of thousands of relay nodes run by volunteers worldwide. As we all know, some countries censor Internet traffic. So Tor traffic is blocked there because its anonymity conflicts with the Internet censorship. Normal Tor traffic can be blocked by identifying its protocol packets and entry nodes which are listed in the main Tor directory. To circumvent Internet censorship, Tor introduces bridge relay nodes and pluggable transports. Bridge relay nodes are not listed in the main Tor directory so that nobody can get all the bridge relay nodes to block them. Pluggable transports manipulate all Tor traffic between Tor client and Tor entry node so that it’s not identifiable. Obfs4 is the latest pluggable transport of Tor, which can obfuscate the Tor traffic and have it look random. In this talk, we’ll dissect the mechanism of Tor bridge mode in combination with the pluggable transport obfs4. First of all, we’ll explain the methods Tor Browser are using to get the information of bridge relay nodes. We will spend some time on explaining how to find the built-in bridge relay nodes by Reversing Engineering. Secondly, we’ll talk about the pluggable transport obfs4. We’ll explain how this protocol disguises Tor traffic to have it look random so that it’s hard to be identified. Finally, we’ll explain how Tor Browser works in bridge mode in combination with the pluggable transport obfs4. You’ll understand how obfs4 bridge client communicates with Tor client and obfs4 bridge relay node respectively. We’ll show you how a packet is sealed by Tor client, then obfs4 bridge client and finally transported to obfs4 bridge relay node.”
Dissect Tor Bridge and Pluggable Transport image
Peixue Li
Dissect Tor Bridge and Pluggable Transport image
Xiaopeng Zhang
DINNER – On Your Own image
19:3700:00
DINNER – On Your Own
Kids Safe Program image
09:0011:50
Kids Safe Program
Ham radio and YOU image
09:0009:50
Ham radio and YOU
Ham radio touches on so many topics that attendees of the conference may find interesting but just don’t know about. 1. What is ham radio? FCC definition as well as the stated purpose of some radio clubs, emergency communication organizations, and technical experimenters. Brief discussion of electromagnetic radiation, frequency allocations, the “band plan” as well as the Considerate Operator’s Frequency Guide. 2. Why ham radio? Staying in contact during emergencies, experimenting with new technology, contesting, computing. 3. Where is ham radio? Everywhere! Describe some of the different radio waves passing through us as we speak and how ham radio has influenced those waves and how it applies to hacking, electronics, and life in general. 4. How do you get to be a “ham?” Licensing procedure and interesting reasons to do so, study tips, etc.
Ham radio and YOU image
Brandon Curnutte
Ham Test image
10:0011:50
Ham Test
LUNCH – On Your Own image
12:0012:50
LUNCH – On Your Own
Closing Ceremony image
13:0014:00
Closing Ceremony
Closing Ceremony image
Benny Karnes
Sr. Security Engineer at Live Nation Entertainment
Select date to see events.

This is a preliminary schedule and minor changes or updates are expected.

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